Republican affiliation

Republican affiliation

Wide Gender Gap, Growing Educational Divide in Voters’ Party Identification 1. There continue to be fundamental differences in the partisan orientation of different demographic groups, and in many cases these gaps have grown wider in recent years. For instance, gender, generational, geographic and educational divides are now as wide, or wider, than in Pew Research Center surveys going back more than two decades. The partisan breakdown of men is relatively unchanged over republican affiliation period.

The Democratic gains among women have not come from increased affiliation with the party. Since 2010, white voters have been more likely to align with the GOP than with the Democrats. This growth is attributable to a slight increase in Democratic-leaning independents, rather than a rise in Democratic affiliation. While black voters remain solidly Democratic, identification with the Democratic Party has declined modestly in recent years: About two-thirds of African Americans have identified as Democrats in the last several years, down slightly from the first half of Barack Obama’s presidency, when about three-quarters affiliated with the Democratic Party. Hispanic voters are more likely to affiliate with or lean toward the Democratic Party than the GOP. The overall balance of partisan orientation among Hispanics is little changed over the last decade. A gender gap in partisan affiliation and leaning is seen across racial and ethnic groups.